Quantcast

10 Pieces Of Propaganda That Reveal How China Sees The World

China is doing its best to make the world like them. They’re heavily wrapped up in a “soft power” campaign, which means that instead of force, they’re trying to use propaganda to get what they want. They want to manipulate the way the world thinks—and they’re not even trying to hide it. They’re actually weirdly open about it, even publicly releasing reports on their progress. These propagandas were meant for the Chinese people but wrong, it is for the West. Here's a list of their propagandas. What do you think?
0 0 0
China is doing its best to make the world like them. They’re heavily wrapped up in a “soft power” campaign, which means that instead of force, they’re trying to use propaganda to get what they want. They want to manipulate the way the world thinks—and they’re not even trying to hide it. They’re actually weirdly open about it, even publicly releasing reports on their progress. These propagandas were meant for the Chinese people but wrong, it is for the West. Here's a list of their propagandas. What do you think?
0
0
1 | 0.00%
In 2014, a Twitter account for singer Tom Hugo started spouting nothing but pro-Chinese propaganda. Every tweet was either a picture of Tibetan people getting along.

The best way to get Westerners to listen, China now believes, is through celebrities. This, a lot of people think, is why the Chinese film industry is getting bigger—because when China controls the films in our theaters, they can control the message. As Jackie Chan told an audience in Shanghai, “If we can make a film that earns [$1.5 billion], then people from all over the world who study film will learn Chinese, instead of us learning English.”
See all 0 comments
Tom Hugo's Tibetan Twitter Account

In 2014, a Twitter account for singer Tom Hugo started spouting nothing but pro-Chinese propaganda. Every tweet was either a picture of Tibetan people getting along.

The best way to get Westerners to listen, China now believes, is through celebrities. This, a lot of people think, is why the Chinese film industry is getting bigger—because when China controls the films in our theaters, they can control the message. As Jackie Chan told an audience in Shanghai, “If we can make a film that earns [$1.5 billion], then people from all over the world who study film will learn Chinese, instead of us learning English.”

0
0
2 | 0.00%
A Chinese rapper who calls himself Chuckie released a hip, broken English rap song that tries really, really hard not to look like it was created by the ministry of propaganda. It was, though—and it makes its intention very clear from the start: “I want to restore the impression that you have on my country, China,” the song begins, “which have been exactly fabricated by media for a long time.”

Chuckie is part of a propaganda program, and he has other songs that don’t get released to the West that show us what China’s hiding. His tone is very, very different when he raps to a Chinese audience: “All you f—ts from the Western better shut your mouth, you media punk a— white trash motherf—ers!”
See all 0 comments
'This Is China'

A Chinese rapper who calls himself Chuckie released a hip, broken English rap song that tries really, really hard not to look like it was created by the ministry of propaganda. It was, though—and it makes its intention very clear from the start: “I want to restore the impression that you have on my country, China,” the song begins, “which have been exactly fabricated by media for a long time.”

Chuckie is part of a propaganda program, and he has other songs that don’t get released to the West that show us what China’s hiding. His tone is very, very different when he raps to a Chinese audience: “All you f—ts from the Western better shut your mouth, you media punk a— white trash motherf—ers!”

0
0
3 | 0.00%
A music video about China’s latest Five Year Plan is a bit of a tough sell—but they definitely tried their hardest. To announce their latest government policies to the Western world, China made a psychedelic cartoon where David Bowie stands on top of a Volkswagen Bus and sings about Chinese economic policies.

The video is a subtle, innocuous way of making the Chinese political system’s decision-making process seem legitimate. It’s a subtle way of getting people who live in democracies to be comfortable with the communist system.
See all 0 comments
'China's 13th Five Year Plan'

A music video about China’s latest Five Year Plan is a bit of a tough sell—but they definitely tried their hardest. To announce their latest government policies to the Western world, China made a psychedelic cartoon where David Bowie stands on top of a Volkswagen Bus and sings about Chinese economic policies.

The video is a subtle, innocuous way of making the Chinese political system’s decision-making process seem legitimate. It’s a subtle way of getting people who live in democracies to be comfortable with the communist system.

0
0
4 | 0.00%
The propaganda ministry did everything they could to make this video go viral. Chinese papers published articles calling it “viral” as soon as it was released, clearly working off the idea that, if they said it enough, it would happen.

Democracy, the video suggests, is like a bunch of fans voting for their favorite contestant in a spectacle. But it’s worse than that. The most important thing you need to be president, according to the video, is “an unending flow of greenbacks.”
See all 0 comments
'How Leaders Are Made'

The propaganda ministry did everything they could to make this video go viral. Chinese papers published articles calling it “viral” as soon as it was released, clearly working off the idea that, if they said it enough, it would happen.

Democracy, the video suggests, is like a bunch of fans voting for their favorite contestant in a spectacle. But it’s worse than that. The most important thing you need to be president, according to the video, is “an unending flow of greenbacks.”

0
0
5 | 0.00%
The state news agency Xinhua released an animated music video in February 3, 2016 in its latest campaign for the hearts and minds of Chinese citizens.
See all 0 comments
Chinese Propaganda Turns to Pop Rap

The state news agency Xinhua released an animated music video in February 3, 2016 in its latest campaign for the hearts and minds of Chinese citizens.

0
0
6 | 0.00%
Xi Jinping has forced propaganda officers to utilize digital media to resist foreign popular culture influences, and to target younger audiences, the New York Times reported.

The party has invested millions in animated videos, while Chinese scholars copy TED-style talks to criticize the West.

They even have lame “hip hop” groups that suck up to the CCP and warn about America’s efforts to topple the regime.

And now even Apple is getting in on the selling out game. At the behest of Beijing, Apple has kicked the New York Times out of China’s Apple Store.

Chinese law prohibits the publication of “harmful information” — aka reality — online.
See all 0 comments
Chinese propaganda animation targets Chinese millennials

Xi Jinping has forced propaganda officers to utilize digital media to resist foreign popular culture influences, and to target younger audiences, the New York Times reported.

The party has invested millions in animated videos, while Chinese scholars copy TED-style talks to criticize the West.

They even have lame “hip hop” groups that suck up to the CCP and warn about America’s efforts to topple the regime.

And now even Apple is getting in on the selling out game. At the behest of Beijing, Apple has kicked the New York Times out of China’s Apple Store.

Chinese law prohibits the publication of “harmful information” — aka reality — online.

0
0
7 | 0.00%
In 2015, before President Xi Jinping visited the United States, China released a video to explain to Americans who their leader was. It interviewed a group of foreign students in China and had them explain who Xi Jinping is—which they mostly did by talking about how handsome he is.

“If my husband is like him, I will be happy,” one girl tells the camera. Another calls him “handsome” and “super charismatic.” The video calls the president of China “Xi Dada,” with one student saying, “He is not just a leader, but he is like a part of their family.”
See all 0 comments
'Who Is Xi Dada?'

In 2015, before President Xi Jinping visited the United States, China released a video to explain to Americans who their leader was. It interviewed a group of foreign students in China and had them explain who Xi Jinping is—which they mostly did by talking about how handsome he is.

“If my husband is like him, I will be happy,” one girl tells the camera. Another calls him “handsome” and “super charismatic.” The video calls the president of China “Xi Dada,” with one student saying, “He is not just a leader, but he is like a part of their family.”

0
0
8 | 0.00%
Eric X. Li somehow managed to convince TED Talks to let him stand onstage and spout Chinese political propaganda for the cameras. Like the cartoon “How Leaders Are Made,” he wanted to convince Americans that the Chinese political system works. It’s really the same idea. Li, though, is just targeting an older audience.
See all 0 comments
'A Tale Of Two Political Systems'

Eric X. Li somehow managed to convince TED Talks to let him stand onstage and spout Chinese political propaganda for the cameras. Like the cartoon “How Leaders Are Made,” he wanted to convince Americans that the Chinese political system works. It’s really the same idea. Li, though, is just targeting an older audience.

0
0
9 | 0.00%
On National Security Education Day—which, yes, is a real day in China—the government released a pamphlet called Dangerous Love, warning Chinese women to be ever vigilant against the most dangerous of threats: foreign men.
See all 0 comments
Dangerous Love

On National Security Education Day—which, yes, is a real day in China—the government released a pamphlet called Dangerous Love, warning Chinese women to be ever vigilant against the most dangerous of threats: foreign men.

0
0
10 | 0.00%
The alliance between the US and Japan is a big deal for the Chinese government. They’re deeply invested in the South China Sea, and they’re worried about America’s influence. They’re so worried, in fact, that, in 2011, China spent $400,000 a month to play a propaganda video in Times Square just to tell Americans to stay out South China Sea negotiations.

If the US doesn’t back off, though, they’re ready to fight. That’s the key idea behind the 3-D video above. It shows a Chinese plane getting unjustly shot down—and then China absolutely blasting the hell out of the US military in response. In the video, China’s military raids and bombs a US base that happens to look exactly like the one on Okinawa, an area that China wants to claim as its own.
See all 0 comments
'A Full View Of Chinese Military Strength'

The alliance between the US and Japan is a big deal for the Chinese government. They’re deeply invested in the South China Sea, and they’re worried about America’s influence. They’re so worried, in fact, that, in 2011, China spent $400,000 a month to play a propaganda video in Times Square just to tell Americans to stay out South China Sea negotiations.

If the US doesn’t back off, though, they’re ready to fight. That’s the key idea behind the 3-D video above. It shows a Chinese plane getting unjustly shot down—and then China absolutely blasting the hell out of the US military in response. In the video, China’s military raids and bombs a US base that happens to look exactly like the one on Okinawa, an area that China wants to claim as its own.

0
0
11 | 0.00%
Not every propaganda video is intended for Western eyes. “Who Most Wants To Overthrow China?” makes that clear. It’s not meant for the Western audience; it’s meant to warn China about them.
See all 0 comments
'Who Most Wants To Overthrow China?'

Not every propaganda video is intended for Western eyes. “Who Most Wants To Overthrow China?” makes that clear. It’s not meant for the Western audience; it’s meant to warn China about them.